St John's stained glass windows

Christ the King
Christ the King

The window facing west in the Tower is in memory of George Kaye, died 1936, and his wife, Alice, died 1951. The Kaye family were pioneers of Canberra. George was baptized at St John’s in 1859, and Alice (nee Bambridge) in 1858. The inscription is “Thine is the Kingdome” and the window depicts Christ the King.

St Oswald
St Oswald

The window facing north in the Tower, is in memory of Donald P. Israel, a Churchwarden, who died in 1943. The illustration is of St Oswald.

St Paul and St Michael
St Paul and St Michael

The window in the southwest corner of the Church is divided into two panels. The left panel illustrates St Paul, and the right panel shows St Michael. This window was installed in 1936. It has the inscription R.F.C. (Royal Flying Corps) at the top, with the motto: “Per Ardua ad Astra” and was installed in memory of Lieutenant Charles Bruce Campbell, 1890-1917, the son of Frederick and Christina Campbell. Charles was shot down in Cambrai, France, during the Great War.

Canon F G Ward window
Canon F G Ward window

This window is in the south Porch, facing east. It is the second window from the Somme battlefield. The pieces were brought back to Australia by Chaplain Frederick Ward.

Canon F. G. Ward window
Canon F. G. Ward window

This window is in the south Porch, facing west. There are two windows in the original vestry, now the South Porch, which were given to St John’s by Canon Frederick G. Ward, who was rector of St John’s from 1913 to 1929. He was a chaplain in France during the Great War, and when he was serving on the Somme, he gathered some fragments of stained glass from bombed churches and brought them back to Canberra. He arranged for the pieces to be made into windows, which were installed in 1929.

Nathanael, Mary and Martha
Nathanael, Mary and Martha

In memory of George Campbell, who died in London in 1881, his daughter, Sophia Campbell, who died in 1885 at Duntroon, and his infant son, Robert, who died in 1871. The lower panels depict Nathanael under the fig tree with the inscription: “Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no guile.” The upper panels show Jesus meeting with Mary and Martha, the inscription being: “Mary has chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her”. This window was installed in 1886.

St Dorothy window
St Dorothy window

The window on the south side of the Chancel shows St. Dorothy carrying a basket of flowers and fruit. It was installed in 1926 in memory of Dorothea Williams, the wife of Louis Williams, a Melbourne church architect who had supervised the restoration of St John’s. Dorothea and Louis were married at St John’s in 1916. She died in 1919, aged 27, and her family arranged for the window to be installed.

Sister May Hayman window
Sister May Hayman window

The window in the southeast corner of the Sanctuary is in memory of Sister May Hayman, a missionary who served with the Australian Board of Missions from 1936 in New Guinea. May died at the hands of the Japanese in 1942 during the invasion of New Guinea. The window depicts May in her nurse’s uniform and was installed in 1949.

East end window installed 1874
East end window installed 1874

The window is in memory of Robert Campbell. The left panel of the window illustrates the angel telling Zachariah that he will become the father of John. The centre panel shows John the Baptist baptising Jesus in the River Jordan. The right panel illustrates John the Baptist foretelling the coming of our Lord. The banner is inscribed: “Agnes Dei” (Lamb of God). The Campbell family crest in the centre panel has the motto: “Agite pro viribus” (work with all your might).

Sanctuary window
Sanctuary window

The narrow patterned window in the north corner of the Sanctuary dates from the time when the church was extended between 1872 and 1874. It is not inscribed.

Pair of patterned windows
Pair of patterned windows

The pair of patterned windows on opposite sides at the east end of the Nave are in memory of Elizabeth Gibbes who died in 1874 (on the north side) and Colonel John George Nathaniel Gibbes, who died in 1873 (on the south side). In 1859 the Gibbes moved from Sydney to Yarralumla to live with their son, Augustus. Each window shows the family coat of arms of three battle axes, with the motto “Tenax Propositi”, which may be interpreted as “Holding Fast”. The windows were installed in 1876.

Pair of patterned windows
Pair of patterned windows

The pair of patterned windows on opposite sides at the east end of the Nave are in memory of Elizabeth Gibbes who died in 1874 (on the north side) and Colonel John George Nathaniel Gibbes, who died in 1873 (on the south side). In 1859 the Gibbes moved from Sydney to Yarralumla to live with their son, Augustus. Each window shows the family coat of arms of three battle axes, with the motto “Tenax Propositi”, which may be interpreted as “Holding Fast”. The windows were installed in 1876.